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InTimeForSpace1
InTimeForSpace1
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April 20th, 2017 at 9:39:22 AM permalink
Quote: AxelWolf

... but I would rather talk like a normal person than sound like a complete nerdy a*sh*le.

Who are you calling an A***Wol*?
Last edited by: InTimeForSpace1 on Apr 20, 2017
Believers are the ones who keep at it long after they've been told it can't be done. On the other hand, the real experts shouldn't care about the crackpots. But, if the wrong answer begs the question, then the wrong question begs the answer.
Joeman
Joeman
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April 20th, 2017 at 9:56:58 AM permalink
Quote: AxelWolf

I take it that's a dig on my improper use of grammar, punctuation and spelling on the forum? I can assure you, that doesn't carry over as to how I to speak in person. I have no doubt I use some "acceptable" slang while speaking, but I would rather talk like a normal person than sound like a complete nerdy a*sh*le.

Speaking of which, I just noticed a few posts above.

Sorry, Axel, that was not a dig at you! I'm not the grammar police! (Although I may be a complete nerdy a*$h*le, depending on who you ask. ;)

I was attempting to (evidently not so) humorously demonstrate that "learn" is often misused instead of "teach" in the same way that "borrow" is misused instead of "lend" in your example.

No insult intended.
"Dealer has 'rock'... Pay 'paper!'"
RS
RS
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April 20th, 2017 at 11:08:52 AM permalink
I remember in my 4'th grade grammar class, one of the topics we "learned" about was this exact topic. Learn vs teach, borrow vs lend, etc. I couldn't believe this was something we actually had to learn.....like it's just common sense.


Something else that I've never really liked but somehow have said it myself is when someone says best instead of better. Instead of "you better get home soon" it's "you best get home soon." Or is that actual correct somehow?
"should of played 'Go Fish' today ya peasant" -typoontrav
Ibeatyouraces
Ibeatyouraces
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April 20th, 2017 at 11:11:04 AM permalink
Apparently, he didn't know that "I'll learn ya something" is a comedic line.
"And that's the bottom lineeeee, cuz Stone Cold said so!"
AxelWolf
AxelWolf
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April 20th, 2017 at 11:19:42 AM permalink
Quote: InTimeForSpace1

Who are you calling an A***Wol*?

Of course not, why would you think that? Guilty conscience?
♪♪Now you swear and kick and beg us That you're not a gamblin' man Then you find you're back in Vegas With a handle in your hand♪♪ Your black cards can make you money So you hide them when you're able In the land of casinos and money You must put them on the table♪♪ You go back Jack do it again roulette wheels turinin' 'round and 'round♪♪ You go back Jack do it again♪♪
Mission146
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Mission146
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April 20th, 2017 at 7:34:16 PM permalink
Quote: RS


Something else that I've never really liked but somehow have said it myself is when someone says best instead of better. Instead of "you better get home soon" it's "you best get home soon." Or is that actual correct somehow?



The way that you are phrasing it is grammatically incorrect, but if you were to say, "You'd best get home soon," then you would be in the clear. The, "You'd best," is a pretty common thing in the South and in some areas of Appalachia, and it is actually considered antiquated (but still correct) in England.

It is important to remember that, 'Best,' is a superlative, so the sentence makes sense if the action being suggested is the most superior of all possible actions. 'Better,' is generally more of a comparative term referring to two choices and choosing the best of those two choices. In a situation in which, 'Best,' could rightfully be used, it would be assumed that you would have more than two options. For instance, the person in your sentence could go home, stay where he/she is, go to the store, jump off a bridge, take a nap up in a tree...but, they'd best go home.

Ultimately, it just ends up being a shortened way of saying, "It would be best if you (action)."

Again, not technically incorrect, just unusual.
Vultures can't be choosers.
AxelWolf
AxelWolf
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April 22nd, 2017 at 1:24:46 PM permalink
Quote: Mission146

The way that you are phrasing it is grammatically incorrect, but if you were to say, "You'd best get home soon," then you would be in the clear. The, "You'd best," is a pretty common thing in the South and in some areas of Appalachia, and it is actually considered antiquated (but still correct) in England.

It is important to remember that, 'Best,' is a superlative, so the sentence makes sense if the action being suggested is the most superior of all possible actions. 'Better,' is generally more of a comparative term referring to two choices and choosing the best of those two choices. In a situation in which, 'Best,' could rightfully be used, it would be assumed that you would have more than two options. For instance, the person in your sentence could go home, stay where he/she is, go to the store, jump off a bridge, take a nap up in a tree...but, they'd best go home.

Ultimately, it just ends up being a shortened way of saying, "It would be best if you (action)."

Again, not technically incorrect, just unusual.

It's, "You'd best be getting home now boy" or "We best be getting home now"

It's almost always used by older or country people. I seem to remember many old westerns used to give some charaiter for someone like Gabby Hayes.
♪♪Now you swear and kick and beg us That you're not a gamblin' man Then you find you're back in Vegas With a handle in your hand♪♪ Your black cards can make you money So you hide them when you're able In the land of casinos and money You must put them on the table♪♪ You go back Jack do it again roulette wheels turinin' 'round and 'round♪♪ You go back Jack do it again♪♪
InTimeForSpace1
InTimeForSpace1
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April 22nd, 2017 at 1:38:22 PM permalink
Quote:

Using “better” by itself is fine except in formal English. “In a wide range of informal circumstances (but never in formal contexts) the had or ’d can be dispensed with,” Fowler’s says.

Merriam-Webster’s Dictionary of English Usage calls “had better” a standard English idiom and agrees with Fowler’s that “better,” when used alone in this sense, “is not found in very formal surroundings.”

The Oxford English Dictionary’s earliest citation for the construction without “had” is from a pseudonymous letter to a newspaper by “Major Jack Downing”:

“My clothes had got so shabby, I thought I better hire out a few days and get slicked up a little.” (The letter was published in a book in 1834 but was written in 1831.)

The OED says the abbreviated usage originated in the US, and labels it a colloquialism. But Merriam-Webster’s Collegiate Dictionary (11th ed.) lists it without reservations.

The Merriam-Webster’s editors give the example “you better hurry,” and says “better” in this sense is a “verbal auxiliary.”

It should be noted that even the full phrase, “had better,” was criticized by some in the 19th century on the ground that it was illogical and couldn’t be parsed: an 1897 issue of the Ohio Educational Monthly says many teachers found “had better” and other idioms “very difficult to dispose of grammatically.”


https://english.stackexchange.com/questions/236948/id-better-vs-i-better

The best solution is to avoid "acceptably unacceptable" language.
Believers are the ones who keep at it long after they've been told it can't be done. On the other hand, the real experts shouldn't care about the crackpots. But, if the wrong answer begs the question, then the wrong question begs the answer.
billryan
billryan
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April 22nd, 2017 at 3:44:28 PM permalink
Quote: Mission146

The way that you are phrasing it is grammatically incorrect, but if you were to say, "You'd best get home soon," then you would be in the clear. The, "You'd best," is a pretty common thing in the South and in some areas of Appalachia, and it is actually considered antiquated (but still correct) in England.

It is important to remember that, 'Best,' is a superlative, so the sentence makes sense if the action being suggested is the most superior of all possible actions. 'Better,' is generally more of a comparative term referring to two choices and choosing the best of those two choices. In a situation in which, 'Best,' could rightfully be used, it would be assumed that you would have more than two options. For instance, the person in your sentence could go home, stay where he/she is, go to the store, jump off a bridge, take a nap up in a tree...but, they'd best go home.

Ultimately, it just ends up being a shortened way of saying, "It would be best if you (action)."

Again, not technically incorrect, just unusual.



Its easier than saying "Nothing good will come from you staying here. Now go"!
It's what you do and not what you say If you're not part of the future then get out of the way
rxwine
rxwine
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April 22nd, 2017 at 7:14:37 PM permalink
Quote: Ibeatyouraces

Apparently, he didn't know that "I'll learn ya something" is a comedic line.



If comedy is an ass beating.
prisoner of gravity

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