Ayecarumba
Ayecarumba
Joined: Nov 17, 2009
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August 7th, 2017 at 7:40:05 PM permalink
As the pursuer, you have more than just the last reported false position to work with. The computer is constrained to move one space each turn, and you know that at every report the actual position is within one space or less: Why doesn't analysis of the previous reports provide triangulation, and therefore a better idea of the computer's actual position compared to just moving toward the last reported position and ignoring the deductions available from all the available info?
America is all about speed. Hot, nasty, bad-ass speed. - Eleanor Roosevelt, 1936
onenickelmiracle
onenickelmiracle
Joined: Jan 26, 2012
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August 8th, 2017 at 9:50:31 PM permalink
I'm wondering if perhaps these kinds of unsolved math problems have already been solved by mother nature. Thought about this after disturbing an ant hill the other day, the ants seem to have a search pattern down pat.
Looks like sh!t just got imaginary!
FleaStiff
FleaStiff
Joined: Oct 19, 2009
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August 9th, 2017 at 12:22:02 PM permalink
Quote: ThatDonGuy

Besides things like proving Fermat's Last Theorem, that is...
Anyway, at this year's International Mathematical Olympiad,

Oh, wow ... that must be the ultimate.

I have trouble with addition (with subtraction too, but its rare to need any of that). Getting to 21 with confidence and a measure of speed that does not cause premature baldness amongst the other Blackjack players is extremely difficult for me. I don't 'know' that 8 and 3 are 11 but I can quickly count 8, 9, 10, 11 under my breath. 8 and 5 is a bit more of a challenge though. You can see perhaps why BJ dealers don't particularly care for my action. This character defect is also the reason I was so happy to hear of a variant table game wherein the goal is not 21 but 11. I might be able to get the hang of that without too much difficulty.

Infiniate planes, rational, integers, ... it may be rational but it doesn't make sense to me.
FleaStiff
FleaStiff
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August 9th, 2017 at 12:26:51 PM permalink
Quote: onenickelmiracle

I'm wondering if perhaps these kinds of unsolved math problems have already been solved by mother nature. Thought about this after disturbing an ant hill the other day, the ants seem to have a search pattern down pat.

Some artists pour molten aluminum down an anthill to obtain a sculpture of ant tunnels but I believe most foraging behavior is individualized and is the basis of 'swarm behavior' for robots. Kairomonens play an important role as to ant doorkeepers that dab departing ants and sense a failure to return in some which will result in a diminished use of a particular trail.
RS
RS
Joined: Feb 11, 2014
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August 13th, 2017 at 2:52:19 AM permalink
Where did you find this devilish problem? I can't find it anywhere.

Never mind, I found it, ya siwwy wabbit.
"should of played 'Go Fish' today ya peasant" -typoontrav
onenickelmiracle
onenickelmiracle
Joined: Jan 26, 2012
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August 13th, 2017 at 8:19:23 AM permalink
Quote: FleaStiff

Some artists pour molten aluminum down an anthill to obtain a sculpture of ant tunnels but I believe most foraging behavior is individualized and is the basis of 'swarm behavior' for robots. Kairomonens play an important role as to ant doorkeepers that dab departing ants and sense a failure to return in some which will result in a diminished use of a particular trail.

I've heard people claim plants use complex math in their growth, but have never looked into it.
Looks like sh!t just got imaginary!
beachbumbabs
Administrator
beachbumbabs
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August 13th, 2017 at 8:53:17 AM permalink
Quote: onenickelmiracle

I've heard people claim plants use complex math in their growth, but have never looked into it.



Your comment reminded me of a TED talk on this; it was about coral, which isn't exactly plants, but I think is the concept, and expands into all nature. While the whole thing is worth viewing, the lecturer has a very pointed (feminist and climatology) context in the intro that will be a turn-off to several here, so I recommend you skip to the 5 minute mark, where she discusses hyperbolic geometry in very accessible and graphical detail. Trust me; it's worth a viewing.

https://www.ted.com/talks/margaret_wertheim_crochets_the_coral_reef/up-next#t-915933

Yes, it's about crochet, but as a physical manifestation of modeling hyperbolic space which, according to her, was previously considered not possible due to the limitations of 3-dimensional projections and models.
"If the house lost every hand, they wouldn't deal the game."
FleaStiff
FleaStiff
Joined: Oct 19, 2009
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August 13th, 2017 at 12:54:19 PM permalink
Quote: onenickelmiracle

I've heard people claim plants use complex math in their growth, but have never looked into it.

Much of nature does, if not all of it. Mandelbrot sets, etc. Canopy leaves not touching each other, mollusk growth, snake skins, armor cells, parrot fish and coral erosion. Heck, even Face's interest in Pythons reflects their coloration and scale growth in several different wavelengths.

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