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pacomartin
pacomartin
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February 12th, 2012 at 9:32:41 PM permalink
Quote: Wizard

A question for the advanced readers is what is the difference between a grifo and a canilla?



Canilla is a regional dialect (I don't think it is used in Mexico). It literally means "little cane", but by inference it is a reed which carries water.


Grifo is from Latin grȳphus or in English griffin (A mythical beast having the body of a lion and the wings and head of an eagle). Presumably it is related to medieval waterspouts.
Nareed
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February 12th, 2012 at 9:43:24 PM permalink
Quote: Wizard

A question for the advanced readers is what is the difference between a grifo and a canilla?



Ah, very simple. I know what "grifo" means. I've no idea what a "canilla" could possibly be.

BTW, in Mexico the word commonly used is "llave." This also means key, as in the object used to open a lock. If you wan tap water, yous ay "agua de la llave."

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When I hear grifo what comes to my mind is a boligrafo (pen). Does this imply a pen is like a faucet of ink?



No. I've no idea of the derivation of the word "grifo," but the suffix "grafo" is easy. it comes from the Greek "graphos," meaning to write. That's where words like "graphics" and "seismograph" come from, too.

More important, "bolígrafo" does not mean "pen." It means "ball-point pen." It's a combination, more or less, of the word "bola, meaning ball, and "graphos." As is well-known, ball-point pens use a tiny ball bearing to move ink from the resevoir to the paper.

The generic word for "pen" is "pluma." This also means "feather." The menaing goes back to the time when feathers, or quills, were used to write with ink.

Quote:

They often become one when I put one in my pocket. Funny how they never just start leaking just laying around doing nothing at home.



Because in your pocket the pen gets warm and the ink expands, which doesn't happen when they sit at home on top of a desk or inside a drawer. But leave one out in the sun someday. Of course, today's pens hardly ever leak anymore. I guess the ink formula has changed over the years.

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Can I also call a pen a tintagrifo? Sorry to get so off topic.



Please don't.

Quote:

Esto grifo goteando me está volviendo loco. = That dripping faucet is driving me crazy.



"EstE grifo esta goteando y me está volviendo loco."

That's a bit awkward, though. Try: "La gotera del grifo me está volviendo loco."
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pacomartin
pacomartin
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February 13th, 2012 at 6:59:49 AM permalink
Quote: Nareed

Ah, very simple. I know what "grifo" means. I've no idea what a "canilla" could possibly be.



I think Nareed has stopped reading my posts. I said that "canilla" is related to the Latin word for "cane" and by extension it refers to "reeds". It is a regional word in Spanish for faucet. Directly from DRAE:

Arg., Bol., Par. y Ur. grifo (‖ llave para regular el paso de los líquidos).

So the Wizard's tutor may recognize that use of the word, but no one in North America.
Nareed
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February 13th, 2012 at 7:16:20 AM permalink
Quote: pacomartin

I think Nareed has stopped reading my posts. I said that "canilla" is related to the Latin word for "cane" and by extension it refers to "reeds". It is a regional word in Spanish for faucet.



I do read them. this time yours was posted while I was writing mine. Besides, I don't see a link between cane and reed. And the Spanish word for "cane" is "bastón," not "canilla."
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Wizard
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February 13th, 2012 at 8:18:15 AM permalink
In case anyone is wondering, I got canilla from my set of 1000 Spanish flash cards, which translated it as "faucet." After the poor reception it got here I threw that card away. It is not the first time I've suspected this set of cards to have a lot of antiquated or regional Spanish words in it.
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pacomartin
pacomartin
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February 13th, 2012 at 8:56:55 AM permalink
Quote: Wizard

In case anyone is wondering, I got canilla from my set of 1000 Spanish flash cards, which translated it as "faucet." After the poor reception it got here I threw that card away. It is not the first time I've suspected this set of cards to have a lot of antiquated or regional Spanish words in it.



Well it is the word for faucet in Argentina, Bolivia, Paraguay and Uruguay. They may not recognize "grifo". It is not the Spanish word for "cane", it is the Latin word for "cane" or "reed", so by extension anything that made of reed or cane; reed-pipe, flute; gondola; windpipe or faucet adopted the word.

It is somewhat difficult for Michael since it is not clear where he will be travelling. You have to be careful what dictionary you buy.


Wizard
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February 13th, 2012 at 9:03:14 AM permalink
That dictionary of Chicano Spanish might have said the word for faucet is canilla. Here is what SpanishDict.com says:

canilla
feminine noun
1shinbone (informal) (espinilla); leg (pierna)
2bobbin (bobina) (peninsular Spanish)
3tap (grifo) (RPBr), faucet (United States)

Note definition #3. I assuming that means Chicano Spanish.
It's not whether you win or lose; it's whether or not you had a good bet.
pacomartin
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February 13th, 2012 at 12:19:46 PM permalink
Quote: Wizard

tap (grifo) (RPBr), faucet (United States)



I think that means tap is used in British English, and in the United States, but the word faucet is only used in the United States.

The RP mean River Plate Spanish or castellano rioplatense . So canilla is only used in that dialect, while grifo is used elsewhere.

Nareed
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February 13th, 2012 at 12:48:53 PM permalink
Ok, I'd never heard the word "canilla" before.

You can break Spanish up into three main variants: Spaniard, mexican and South American. I know little about "chicano," but that incorporates English as well as Spanish. Naturally, within these three variants there are sub-variants as well. Some variants are geographical, others have more to do with class. And of course this leaves out Central America and the odd Spanish-speaking areas around the world, like the Canary Islands.

So, I know Mexican Spanish. I do know some of the other two variants, through a few interactions, books, anecdotes, etc. So naturally I will be biased for the Mexican variant.
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pacomartin
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February 13th, 2012 at 4:48:09 PM permalink
Quote: Nareed

Ok, I'd never heard the word "canilla" before.



Well, this is what a sink looks like in Britain, which is virtually unheard of in America.


A standard American sink is what they call a mixed tap. They never use the word faucet.


Of course in Japan a faucet is more likely to have a digital temperature readout, so that you don't actually splash your face with cold water, or burn your hands.


I seem to think that a mixed tap was more common in Mexico, although in public toilets it was often cold water only.

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