Wizardofnothing
Wizardofnothing
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December 31st, 2015 at 7:34:58 PM permalink
My point was they were thriving and now gone
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lilredrooster
lilredrooster
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January 8th, 2016 at 5:16:57 PM permalink
Thoroughbred racing is not in danger although the yearly handle has decreased in recent years. Simulcasting and internet betting saved the sport. In 2014 more than 10.5 billion was bet on thoroughbreds. Harness racing is probably less secure but I don't have figures for it. Equibase lists 21 tracks operating right now in the middle of winter. A very few of them are primarily quarter horse tracks and some of them feature a few thoroughbred races on the daily card. The reduction in the no. of thoroughbred tracks should mean that the size of the fields will be greater which means bigger payouts which means happier gamblers.
𝘣𝘦𝘭𝘪𝘦𝘷𝘦 𝘰𝘯𝘭𝘺 𝘩𝘢𝘭𝘧 𝘰𝘧 𝘸𝘩𝘢𝘵 𝘺𝘰𝘶 𝘴𝘦𝘦 𝘢𝘯𝘥 𝘯𝘰𝘵𝘩𝘪𝘯𝘨 𝘵𝘩𝘢𝘵 𝘺𝘰𝘶 𝘩𝘦𝘢𝘳.........𝖤𝖽𝗀𝖺𝗋 𝖠𝗅𝗅𝖺𝗇 𝖯𝗈𝖾
DrawingDead
DrawingDead
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January 8th, 2016 at 8:58:06 PM permalink
This week the figures for 2015 are in and this year they show: a small percentage increase in total handle over 2014, with significantly fewer total races being run, at fewer tracks, with larger field sizes. The money moves around more and more easily, with less and less of it being bet locally on 8 year old arthritic geldings that never should have been bred, running for a $1,500 purse at Armpit Meadows or Cesspool Downs. According to the figures reported a few days ago by Equibase ( [EDIT: see note below] and readily available at the website of The Jockey Club distilled into the very well presented format of their annual Fact Book at http://www.jockeyclub.com/Default.asp?section=Resources&area=11 ) for the year just ended total wagering handle was up 1.2% to $10.67 billion, and while the number of races run was down, purse money per race was up 4.3%, and wagering per race was up a healthy 7.3% this past year.

Methinks it is not necessarily a bad thing when the money eventually flows to the higher quality product and lousy poorly run little (or even not so little) leaky-roof dump tracks close, even if it doesn't make the people who've been financially or emotionally tied to those not so prosperous places happy. Solution for those salt of the Earth folks: move already, or move your money elsewhere as others have done, or your stock if you can compete with quality, or if not then get a job in something more suitable to your abilities.

EDIT: Looks like as of today the Jockey Club hasn't yet re-published their statistical Fact Book with the recently released numbers, but I'd expect the new edition should be up on their site within days. In the meantime, articles providing quick summaries of the Equibase figures quoted above can be found in reports published in the past 48 to 72 hours from the major trade publications such as Blood-Horse and Daily Racing Form.
Last edited by: DrawingDead on Jan 8, 2016
"I'm against stuff like crack and math" --AxelWolf
Wizardofnothing
Wizardofnothing
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January 9th, 2016 at 12:04:13 AM permalink
I respectfully disagree completely-
Most of the higher purses come from a cut of gaming- I.e. Parx casino in Philadelphia- there is no way this is a thriving sport at all. Millennials have no interest in this sport any longer and more tracks will inevitably close before 2020/. All you have to do is look at how many new tracks have opened.
There has been an initial -10 year bubble/ but when places that were granted slot licenses slowly fight to lower the cut that the track takes from the handle the purses will diminish
No longer hiring, donít ask because I wonít hire you either
lilredrooster
lilredrooster
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January 9th, 2016 at 2:14:57 AM permalink
Quote: Wizardofnothing

I respectfully disagree completely-
Most of the higher purses come from a cut of gaming- I.e. Parx casino in Philadelphia- there is no way this is a thriving sport at all. Millennials have no interest in this sport any longer and more tracks will inevitably close before 2020/. All you have to do is look at how many new tracks have opened.
There has been an initial -10 year bubble/ but when places that were granted slot licenses slowly fight to lower the cut that the track takes from the handle the purses will diminish




This past Thursday, in just one race, at Aqueduct, in a $31,000 maiden claiming race, 255K was bet in the Win, Place, Show Pool; another 224K was bet in the exacta pool and 158K was bet in the trifecta pool. 109K was bet in the superfecta pool, 95K in the daily double pool, 82K in the pick 3 pool and 216K in the pick 4 pool. This is in the middle of winter at New York's least exciting track. 3 of those pools were multi-race pools. Race #9.
Last edited by: lilredrooster on Jan 9, 2016
𝘣𝘦𝘭𝘪𝘦𝘷𝘦 𝘰𝘯𝘭𝘺 𝘩𝘢𝘭𝘧 𝘰𝘧 𝘸𝘩𝘢𝘵 𝘺𝘰𝘶 𝘴𝘦𝘦 𝘢𝘯𝘥 𝘯𝘰𝘵𝘩𝘪𝘯𝘨 𝘵𝘩𝘢𝘵 𝘺𝘰𝘶 𝘩𝘦𝘢𝘳.........𝖤𝖽𝗀𝖺𝗋 𝖠𝗅𝗅𝖺𝗇 𝖯𝗈𝖾
Wizardofnothing
Wizardofnothing
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January 9th, 2016 at 4:34:07 AM permalink
I understand you are a horse racing lover and want to defend it- but clearly it's a dying sport- race tracks have closed left and right/ handles have been down for years- even Atlantic city race course closed the simulcasting/ handles may be up at certain tracks due to consolidations/ just like numbers are up at some Atlantic city casinos from other casinos closing down/ does anyone say Atlantic city is going strong?????
No longer hiring, donít ask because I wonít hire you either
lilredrooster
lilredrooster
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January 9th, 2016 at 5:09:40 AM permalink
I don't think it's useful at least for me to continue this discussion beyond this last post. If you analyze the figures from the Jockey Club you will see that the racing handle has had only a marginal decline since 2011. The numbers are way up if you compare them to the 1994 and older pre-simulcasting days. You use the word "dying." Horse racing has been around for at least 6500 years in various forms. The tracks need to do better regarding their management; there's lots of room for improvement. But dying? No. The figures quoted by the Jockey Club do not include the tremendous amount of betting from offshore books which do not send the money into the pools. The tracks benefit from this because they charge the books a fee for the simulcast signal.
𝘣𝘦𝘭𝘪𝘦𝘷𝘦 𝘰𝘯𝘭𝘺 𝘩𝘢𝘭𝘧 𝘰𝘧 𝘸𝘩𝘢𝘵 𝘺𝘰𝘶 𝘴𝘦𝘦 𝘢𝘯𝘥 𝘯𝘰𝘵𝘩𝘪𝘯𝘨 𝘵𝘩𝘢𝘵 𝘺𝘰𝘶 𝘩𝘦𝘢𝘳.........𝖤𝖽𝗀𝖺𝗋 𝖠𝗅𝗅𝖺𝗇 𝖯𝗈𝖾

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