gofaster87
gofaster87
Joined: Mar 19, 2011
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April 25th, 2011 at 1:37:26 PM permalink
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MrV
MrV
Joined: Feb 13, 2010
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April 25th, 2011 at 4:38:59 PM permalink
Quote: PeteM

Where in Oregon? Is that the one in Coos Bay?



No, you are thinking of The Mill Casino, which as of about one year ago had gotten rid of their only craps table.

The Chinook Winds Casino is in Lincoln City, Oregon, south of Tillamook, north of Newport.

It is about 28 miles west of Spirit Mountain Casino, which is in Grand Ronde; I usually play at both when I head out to dance with the devil.

Of the two, Chinook Winds gives better comps, and there is more to do in Lincoln City than gamble: that cannot be said for Grand Ronde.
"What, me worry?"
ssjdra
ssjdra
Joined: Apr 12, 2011
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April 26th, 2011 at 9:50:28 AM permalink
While craps is one of the harder games to understand, I do not see it dying off anytime soon. In my opinion it is one of the most exciting games within a casino. The rush you get while rolling hot cannot be duplicated by VP/Slot machines or even other table games. For that reason alone it attracts people. Beyond that, Craps has pretty good value for the buck, as the smart craps game (pass w/odds) will cost you less than half a percent in -EV. Even with the 6/8 place bets thrown in the mix, the -EV is not bad at all. In terms of entertainment value for the dollar, craps is tough to beat.

Also, there is a wealth of information online for basic craps bets as well as free craps games. The younger crowd, who is savvy to the ways of google searching, will have no problem finding information and running through a couple thousand rolls online, before they actually step up to the table in a live casino. This takes the intimidation element down a few notches, granted it is still fairly high.

As was mentioned before, the only thing that can kill a young crowd is high table minimums. 20-something kids do not have the bankroll for a $15 minimum tables. They are probably most comfortable at $5 table.
7outlineaway
7outlineaway
Joined: Nov 13, 2009
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April 26th, 2011 at 10:20:06 AM permalink
I think craps' nature of appealing to an older crowd has helped it during the recession.

Older people have the most disposable income of any demographic in the US. This is due to multiple factors: holding more prestigious jobs due to longer work experience, no kids to care for, pension/social security income, investments/savings and so on. The recession didn't hurt this group as much, and some were retired and didn't have a job to lose in the first place.

So craps has suffered far less than most other games have, at least in Nevada.

I think this also explains why craps draws an older crowd in the first place. In order to minimize the house edge you need to take as much odds as possible. That $10 table is really a $20-50 table (considering the amount of odds most craps players take). So you need a bigger bankroll to start with and also to withstand the greater variance than in BJ or many other games. Generally a higher percentage of 65 year-olds than 25-year olds will have $500 or whatever to drop at a craps table.
buzzpaff
buzzpaff
Joined: Mar 8, 2011
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April 26th, 2011 at 10:25:05 AM permalink
Quote: 7outlineaway

I think craps' nature of appealing to an older crowd has helped it during the recession.

Older people have the most disposable income of any demographic in the US. This is due to multiple factors: holding more prestigious jobs due to longer work experience, no kids to care for, pension/social security income, investments/savings and so on. The recession didn't hurt this group as much, and some were retired and didn't have a job to lose in the first place.

So craps has suffered far less than most other games have, at least in Nevada.

I think this also explains why craps draws an older crowd in the first place. In order to minimize the house edge you need to take as much odds as possible. That $10 table is really a $20-50 table (considering the amount of odds most craps players take). So you need a bigger bankroll to start with and also to withstand the greater variance than in BJ or many other games. Generally a higher percentage of 65 year-olds than 25-year olds will have $500 or whatever to drop at a craps table.



Having $500 to drop and willingness to do same are 2 very different animals.
pacomartin
pacomartin
Joined: Jan 14, 2010
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April 26th, 2011 at 11:53:39 AM permalink
Quote: 7outlineaway

I think craps' nature of appealing to an older crowd has helped it during the recession. Older people have the most disposable income of any demographic in the US. So craps has suffered far less than most other games have, at least in Nevada.



It's an overstatement to say it has dropped far less than other games in Nevada. It has dropped slightly less. Horse race betting appeals to an older crowd also and had dropped by over half.

baccarat +10.58%
craps -18.32%
roulette -18.34%
3 - card -19.47%
sports -19.99%
blackjack -32.42%
race -52.94%
other table games -24.32%


The real lesson in table games is that baccarat is the only improvement, and blackjack did much worse in every possible way. It was the first table game to begin decaying as much as 6 months before the recession really began, it dropped further, and came back far less.

The drop in roulette and craps is almost identical. Yet one is probably the easiest table game to play with almost intuitive rules, and the other takes some time and effort to learn the bets, the odds, and the protocol.
buzzpaff
buzzpaff
Joined: Mar 8, 2011
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April 26th, 2011 at 12:00:12 PM permalink
Even a one horse town like Grand Junction, Colorado now has a horse race betting parlor. And yes, I have apologized to the horse since moving here.
TIMSPEED
TIMSPEED
Joined: Aug 11, 2010
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April 26th, 2011 at 2:43:18 PM permalink
I agree that craps seems to be dying a slow death...since I've started playing a few years ago, I've noticed that the tables have been getting less crowded and ESPECIALLY less crowded with younger players. I myself am now 28, and no one is a "regular" player that's under 45...craps just doesn't appeal to the younger crowd because it's a real volatile game.
On a related note: I think gambling in general is going that way...as I've noticed no young-blood in the casinos regularly (tourists yes, but no actual "regulars")...but maybe I'm just an addict?
Gambling calls to me...like this ~> http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=4Nap37mNSmQ
BenJammin
BenJammin
Joined: Nov 1, 2009
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April 26th, 2011 at 6:20:34 PM permalink
I'm sure the casinos would like to see Craps go away in favor of some other game with a higher house take.

Craps is really one of the easiest games to learn if you stick to a few basic bets. The board was set up to confuse the players and offer sucker bets. I believe John Scarne was consulted on the layout.

Even with single only odds the house take is less than one percent on a pass line bet.

I won money last weekend at the Fremont . It can be done!

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/John_Scarne
If a little is good, more's got to be better!
FleaStiff
FleaStiff
Joined: Oct 19, 2009
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April 26th, 2011 at 6:45:04 PM permalink
Quote: BenJammin

Even with single only odds the house take is less than one percent on a pass line bet.


Well, there is a difference between house edge and the take or hold or whatever. I understand, however, the significance of this. Craps Players listen to that stickman!

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