LouisTrez
LouisTrez
Joined: Mar 29, 2017
  • Threads: 1
  • Posts: 17
June 16th, 2017 at 10:29:11 AM permalink
Interesting and I would agree with you on that. I think the non-randomness results in more severe streaks than a random deck also. I would think the 10's tend to get grouped together in the discard rack and may not be randomly split apart in the shuffle. It seems like when a deck gets sour it can stay sour for a long time and vice versa but hard to prove any of that. One thing I've always wanted to track in real life is how often the dealer busts showing an Ace. Theoretically the dealer busts only about 20% of the time showing an Ace, but it seems he busts at a higher rate, drawing a 10-10 more often than he should.

If anybody knows of a true shuffle routine, we would be interested.
QFIT
QFIT
Joined: Feb 12, 2010
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June 16th, 2017 at 10:32:16 AM permalink
My experimentation and that of others shows otherwise. My configurable real shuffle routines provide the same results as random shuffles.
"It is impossible to begin to learn that which one thinks one already knows." -Epictetus
LouisTrez
LouisTrez
Joined: Mar 29, 2017
  • Threads: 1
  • Posts: 17
June 16th, 2017 at 11:04:04 AM permalink
Quote: QFIT

My experimentation and that of others shows otherwise. My configurable real shuffle routines provide the same results as random shuffles.


I can see how that would all come out in the wash after 20 billion cycles. But have you ever seen/performed a "small sample size" study? Just thinking out loud here, maybe compare a billion 3-shoe results, random vs. shuffled and see if the shuffled have a higher standard deviation. Wouldn't that indicate "streakier" results? Or am I crazy on that?
QFIT
QFIT
Joined: Feb 12, 2010
  • Threads: 1
  • Posts: 274
June 16th, 2017 at 11:09:42 AM permalink
Yes. The results are the same. Unless the shuffle is seriously flawed.

Now, if you're a shuffle-tracker, that's a different story. You are essentially manipulating the result of the shuffle by cutting in a prescribed spot and adjusting the counts accordingly.
"It is impossible to begin to learn that which one thinks one already knows." -Epictetus

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