rep
rep
Joined: Jun 25, 2014
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June 26th, 2014 at 5:29:55 PM permalink
I always questioned this, because I really don't know, or how to find out. Thanks! I'm up by Tacoma, Washington.
ThatDonGuy
ThatDonGuy
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June 26th, 2014 at 5:48:35 PM permalink
The only law I know they have to comply with is the ban on sports books outside of Nevada.
DrawingDead
DrawingDead
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June 26th, 2014 at 6:29:43 PM permalink
I'm aware of at least some non-gaming laws that they don't choose to follow. For example in Nevada smoking is not permitted in restaurants, except in the Avi casino, near Laughlin, on tribal land. I've never been clear on whether they must be subject to State Gaming Enforcement for casino gaming disputes, but whether or not they must agree to that, they apparently have, because I saw a poker room dispute become a Nevada Gaming Enforcement complaint.
Nevermind.
Pokeraddict
Pokeraddict
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June 26th, 2014 at 6:44:01 PM permalink
Quote: DrawingDead

I'm aware of at least some non-gaming laws that they don't choose to follow. For example in Nevada smoking is not permitted in restaurants, except in the Avi casino, near Laughlin, on tribal land. I've never been clear on whether they must be subject to State Gaming Enforcement for casino gaming disputes, but whether or not they must agree to that, they apparently have, because I saw a poker room dispute become a Nevada Gaming Enforcement complaint.



State smoking bans never apply to reservations, even if the law specifically banned it in casinos (or restaurants or wherever), reservations may ignore it.
Face
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Face
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June 26th, 2014 at 7:12:01 PM permalink
The answer, obviously, is "it depends".

They don't follow them as a rule, like, just because "X" casino does, we have to as well. However, Vegas is often the foundation for the rules that the tribes build off of.

If it's a Class II facility, broad guidelines are handed down by the Feds, specifically, The I.ndian G.aming R.egulatory A.ct (I spelled it out so you don't Google "IGRA" and spend the rest of the night giggling ;)) From these, the tribes make more specific rules called the MICS (Minimal Internal Control Standars). From these they refine them and become more specific with the creation of the TICS (Tribal Internal Control Standards). The MICS and TICS can vary from tribe to tribe. Some are lenient and/or broad, some are more strict and/or specific. But all of it originates with the Feds.

Class III facilities are governed by the State/Nation Compact. Similar to the Class II process, broad guidelines are formed and agreed upon between the Nation and the State. Typically, the rules and regs follows Vegas, since it's long since been established and all the heavy lifting has been done. However, they are somewhat free to change, add, or delete requirements to suit their own needs. And again, from this Compact we generate our Policy and Procedures manuals, which basically run the casino and keep everything within the agreement in the Compact.
The opinions of this moderator are for entertainment purposes only.
DrawingDead
DrawingDead
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June 26th, 2014 at 7:55:00 PM permalink
Quote: Face

so you don't Google "IGRA" and

Of course you know good & well that I immediately did that. And found it... surprising.
Nevermind.
beachbumbabs
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beachbumbabs
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June 27th, 2014 at 12:44:27 AM permalink
Quote: DrawingDead

Of course you know good & well that I immediately did that. And found it... surprising.



This is not my first rodeo, cowboy....lmao
"If the house lost every hand, they wouldn't deal the game."
rep
rep
Joined: Jun 25, 2014
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June 30th, 2014 at 6:52:59 AM permalink
Well, I had done research on whether casino's can change the pay out on slots on a whim, and the info was a while ago, and it said they had to open the machine up and switch the RNG, but there was also info on network machines at the time being tested, and once implemented, it can be done on a whim, but by law, you couldn't do it while someone was playing the machine, and you had to flash a message on the machine that it was being updated. Being the info was a few years old, it may be that networked machines are the standard now, and I guess Native casino's don't have to comply to the laws I mentioned. That's where I was going with that.
MrV
MrV
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June 30th, 2014 at 7:02:42 AM permalink
Is there any reliable data out there comparing the typical slot hold of tribal slots to those in Las Vegas?
"What, me worry?"
1BB
1BB
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June 30th, 2014 at 7:25:29 AM permalink
Quote: MrV

Is there any reliable data out there comparing the typical slot hold of tribal slots to those in Las Vegas?



Both Connecticut casinos are required by law to submit monthly slot results to the Department of Consumer Protection. They are also required to publicly disclose said results. It can all be found online.
Many people, especially ignorant people, want to punish you for speaking the truth. - Mahatma Ghandi

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