Aussie
Aussie
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December 29th, 2009 at 10:57:03 PM permalink
Am travelling to Vegas in July and have a couple of questions about the high limit areas in strip casinos.

In Australia they are generally a seperate room and to gain access you either have to be invited based on prior play if you are a local or buy in for a certain amount (usually about $5k) in you are from interstate or overseas. How does one gain access to these areas in strip casinos? Can you just wander in uninvited or do you need to show some kind of financial credentials? If so, how much would you need to buy in for at a large casino? Medium casino?

What sort of table minimums would you generally see? What games do they usually provide?

Thanks
FleaStiff
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December 30th, 2009 at 1:01:37 AM permalink
My understanding is that each casino decides how high is high. The minimum table limits are the main constraint.

Also, I believe that Nevada regulations require gaming areas to be open to the public, so a licensee can really only use psychological and social pressure to cajole people who don't belong out of the high limit area.

Baccarat, 21 and roulette are all I would consider playing in a high limit room. Often the most advantageous blackjack rules will be in the high limit area. Best wheels in roulette will be in the High Limit area.

Dealers in a high limit room tend to be experienced and trusted by the casino. Cocktail waitresses are very attentive and premium brands are routinely served.
Wizard
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December 30th, 2009 at 2:41:49 AM permalink
I believe what FleaStiff wrote is correct. By law, high limit areas must be open to the public. I wander into them all the time to investigate rules. Limits on the Strip are usually $200 in blackjack, $100 in baccarat, and $100 in roulette. It is a much nicer experience, if you can afford it.

I might add that Macau is similar or the same as Australia. You need to be invited, and there is a guard to ensure you have the proper card. At the Wynn Macau there is a VIP area, and an VVIP area at the top of the hotel tower. I think they go by front money to gain access, or make private deals with the junket operators.
It's not whether you win or lose; it's whether or not you had a good bet.
Aussie
Aussie
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December 30th, 2009 at 3:13:23 AM permalink
Thanks guys.

One other question. Would any of the casinos be likely to have a Pai Gow (tiles) table in the high limit area?
DJTeddyBear
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December 30th, 2009 at 5:49:43 AM permalink
How high is high?

Most casinos have high limit areas on the floor. These are open and anybody can wander thru. Yeah, they have signs that say that they are for high limit players only, but nobody cares unless you make a nuisance of yourself.

Some casinos also have 'private' areas for the very high limit players. Sometimes, you wouldn't even know it exists.

About three years ago, I was at Foxwoods, heading to my hotel room with the wife. For no particular reason, we hit the button for the top floor, just to see what, if anything, was up there.

To our surprise, it opened to a counter with a receptionist. Behind her was the highest limit tables. She explained that it was exclusive for the high limit players. She didn't go any further to 'qualify' us, nor did we ask.

In retrospect, I wonder if her job was anything more than merely keeping out the riff-raff.

However, she did say that we happened to stop in when there weren't any players, so we could look around if we wanted to.

So we looked around.

Sorry I can't provide any details. I simply don't remember how big it was, or how many tables or what kinds of tables.

All I remember is that it was so dark that I wouldn't want to play there. Even if I had a whale as a buddy, and they allowed me to play next to him at $5 levels - I wouldn't play.


On a side note, do casinos allow that? I.E. If a $1,000+ player wants his $5 buddy to play next to him, is it allowed?
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FleaStiff
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December 30th, 2009 at 5:51:09 AM permalink
High limit rooms often cater to Asian gamblers.
The Baccarat table layout will often omit the number 4 because that is supposedly a death number in many Asian cultures. And ofcourse the number 13 is omitted just as often an office building in the USA will skip the number 13.

I do not know for sure but would expect Bellagio Caesars Venetian/Palazzo to have pai gow tiles available in the high limit room. Websites or hosts might be able to confirm this for you. And if you do expect to be a high roller you just might benefit by prior contact with a casino host. If you are a high roller, I've no idea how much casinos would want you to wire transfer to them, but you might as well ask a host what would be expected of you before you even buy your airline ticket. It will be easy for you to get return visits comped but you might try to get your airfare for your first visit comped too. Certainly you will probably be RFB(Room, Food, Beverage) even at the upper tier places such as The Venetian.
dk
dk
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December 30th, 2009 at 9:01:01 AM permalink
Quote: Aussie

Thanks guys.

One other question. Would any of the casinos be likely to have a Pai Gow (tiles) table in the high limit area?



I believe Mandalay Bay does.

The Tiles table at Palazzo is right next to the high limit area, but not inside. If you ask, I'm sure they'd be happy to raise the limit for you to keep people like me away.
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FleaStiff
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December 30th, 2009 at 1:48:36 PM permalink
Quote: DJTeddyBear

On a side note, do casinos allow that? I.E. If a $1,000+ player wants his $5 buddy to play next to him, is it allowed?

If a thousand dollar player wants the dealer to stand on his head, its allowed! Well, okay... I guess that might take more than just a thousand dollars a play. After all even in the general casino you can usually put five grand down on the line.
The trouble is that usually the people who put a grand down for each bet simply don't have friends who only put down five dollars. I wish I could find some Ms. Moneybags who wanted a 5.00 player like me around!!
Aussie
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December 30th, 2009 at 3:50:54 PM permalink
I wouldn't consider myself a high roller, I just prefer to play in high limit areas (at the minimum) if possible. Average bet on Pai Gow would be $100-$200 which is enough to do this in Australian casinos and by the sounds of it, in Vegas too.

Thanks for your help.
Wizard
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December 30th, 2009 at 4:14:05 PM permalink
Quote:

Would any of the casinos be likely to have a Pai Gow (tiles) table in the high limit area?



I can confirm the Manadaly Bay does. Just a $25 minimum too. I is unusual to be able to play anything for so little in a high limit room. I think the reason is Asian gamblers like a huge bet spread.

Quote:


On a side note, do casinos allow that? I.E. If a $1,000+ player wants his $5 buddy to play next to him, is it allowed?



It is up the discretion of the floor supervisor, but he/she would almost certainly allow it. Your odds of it being allowed go up as your bet goes up (and $1000 is very strong), and the number of other players at the table goes down. It would also help if your friend was an attractive female.
It's not whether you win or lose; it's whether or not you had a good bet.

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