FDEAD3709
FDEAD3709
Joined: Oct 1, 2016
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October 10th, 2016 at 11:18:52 AM permalink
Gambling addiction is so different from the other addictions it is associated with. Not that hard to spot a drunk or crack addict. Gamblers seem to be able to not only hold a job, but to have a successful career. Always thought I could spot a problem gambler.
WRONG !
Used to play into this illegal but very social card room. The owner's wife was a classy lady. Dressed to the nines and would fill in a spot at daily tournaments. Rock of Ages. If she called, I usually folded. If she raised, I definitely folded, Ran into her daughter a few years ago. Mom had been losing big time in Video Poker at a nearby casino.
Long story short, she hid the past due notices on bills and mortgages. Lost everything, Husband stood by her, but they now live in daughter's house and he works 2 jobs.
Actually covered for a guy on evening shift at work so he could go to GA meetings 8 PM Wednesdays. Until a month later I found out he was at a poker game previous Wednesday. Ivan took early retirement offer, blew thru that, kids college fund, and lost a car wash business. Lost wife and kids in the end.
Having a friend hold the money just means OP will not only lose his money, but a friend.
onenickelmiracle
onenickelmiracle
Joined: Jan 26, 2012
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October 10th, 2016 at 11:22:17 AM permalink
I just have a hard time thinking someone who barely loses $100 a month should be considered a serious gambling problem. I doubt he would score very high on a gambler's quiz at gamblers anonymous.
Looks like sh!t just got imaginary!
smoothgrh
smoothgrh
Joined: Oct 26, 2011
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October 10th, 2016 at 12:48:01 PM permalink
Hi,

Here's my perspective on your situation:

You know you have a problem, and you're willing to do something about it. So that's good! Maybe at this point you can't quit gambling altogether, which I think is unrealistic in the short term, but maybe you can manage your situation better?

You know about the odds and house advantages, so it seems you're at a better place than uninformed gamblers. You're also keeping a log of your play, so you're able to see patterns. Perhaps you can look at your situation this way: the odds are about the same whether you're betting the minimum or trying to win big money—so try betting the minimums, and track your unit wins and losses instead of dollar amounts.

You would still spend time at the table or video poker machine to forget your problems, but you'll minimize your losses. You'll occasionally be up a few units, or you'll be down a few units. You can imagine what those losses would have been like had you been betting hundreds of dollars instead of the minimum bet.

I started logging my play about 6 years ago, and am slightly ahead over that time. I've wondered if I made up for the losses I had when I was in my 20s—and guessed probably not. But at least I know that since the start of my tracking, I've been managing my money, and I'm ahead of the casino by a few betting units. Maybe one day you'll feel something as dopey as tracking betting units isn't worth the time and in the long run you can spend your time and money doing something else!

Hope this helps!
FDEAD3709
FDEAD3709
Joined: Oct 1, 2016
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October 10th, 2016 at 2:07:41 PM permalink
Quote: onenickelmiracle

I just have a hard time thinking someone who barely loses $100 a month should be considered a serious gambling problem. I doubt he would score very high on a gambler's quiz at gamblers anonymous.



And you would be WRONG.
Joeshlabotnik
Joeshlabotnik
Joined: Jul 27, 2016
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October 10th, 2016 at 4:26:27 PM permalink
Quote: FDEAD3709

And you would be WRONG.



I think that's a pretty harsh value judgment, one based on your lumping the OP together with the people you know who've had bad experiences.

I have known enough gambling addicts from when I lived in Vegas to know some that whether or not they were technically addicted, had devised strategies to keep their gambling from becoming too harmful. They played the games well, kept a limit on time and money spent, took advantage of deals and bargains (and comps), and kept their losses to a reasonable level.

And then I knew the people who had no such self-discipline and were constantly teetering on life's edge. I knew people whose Friday paycheck was always gone by Saturday morning. I knew people who were slowly bleeding their bank accounts dry--or who had already done so.

Should I lump those two groups of people together?
FDEAD3709
FDEAD3709
Joined: Oct 1, 2016
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October 10th, 2016 at 4:43:11 PM permalink
" . I doubt he would score very high on a gambler's quiz at gamblers anonymous. " And you would be wrong.
That's all. Please refrain from reading anything else into those 5 words. THANKS
Paigowdan
Paigowdan
Joined: Apr 28, 2010
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October 10th, 2016 at 5:19:50 PM permalink
+1

The person who decides if there's an issue or problem with his gambling is the gambler who says that gambling just isn't working for him.
Beware of all enterprises that require new clothes - Henry David Thoreau. Like Dealers' uniforms - Dan.
onenickelmiracle
onenickelmiracle
Joined: Jan 26, 2012
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October 10th, 2016 at 9:15:57 PM permalink
The one thing is he plays fpdw, which earns money played right theoretically, but then his earnings go to the craps table. So his take is like a second job he never keeps the money. Maybe he should just stick to that and drop craps.
Looks like sh!t just got imaginary!
onenickelmiracle
onenickelmiracle
Joined: Jan 26, 2012
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October 10th, 2016 at 9:18:48 PM permalink
1.Did you ever lose time from work or school due to gambling?
2.Has gambling ever made your home life unhappy?
3.Did gambling affect your reputation?
4.Have you ever felt remorse after gambling?
5.Did you ever gamble to get money with which to pay debts or otherwise solve financial difficulties?
6.Did gambling cause a decrease in your ambition or efficiency?
7.After losing did you feel you must return as soon as possible and win back your losses?
8.After a win did you have a strong urge to return and win more?
9.Did you often gamble until your last dollar was gone?
10.Did you ever borrow to finance your gambling?
11.Have you ever sold anything to finance gambling?
12.Were you reluctant to use "gambling money" for normal expenditures?
13.Did gambling make you careless of the welfare of yourself or your family?
14.Did you ever gamble longer than you had planned?
15.Have you ever gambled to escape worry, trouble, boredom or loneliness?
16.Have you ever committed, or considered committing, an illegal act to finance gambling?
17.Did gambling cause you to have difficulty in sleeping?
18.Do arguments, disappointments or frustrations create within you an urge to gamble?
19.Did you ever have an urge to celebrate any good fortune by a few hours of gambling?
20.Have you ever considered self destruction or suicide as a result of your gambling?

Most compulsive gamblers will answer yes to at least seven of these questions.
Looks like sh!t just got imaginary!
onenickelmiracle
onenickelmiracle
Joined: Jan 26, 2012
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October 10th, 2016 at 9:22:04 PM permalink
I thought those questions had more to do with lying, cheating, and stealing to gamble.
Looks like sh!t just got imaginary!

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