LarryS
LarryS
Joined: Feb 26, 2011
  • Threads: 67
  • Posts: 1410
February 21st, 2014 at 5:43:58 PM permalink
The other thread on IQ got me thinking.

I remember growing up and watching jeopardy thru the years and admiring how "smart" some of these eople are.

But now with our technology.....where gameshow questions can be answered from a smartphone or tablet...is memoraization of these facts the signs of "smart "people?
Today if someone knows the answer to the question ?who wrote "Silas Marner"...is it "smart"...or is it as trivial as some who can answer "what was the name of the second episode of Star Trek". Is memorization of knowledge as important in this day and age as it was 20 years ago.

20 years ago, if you didnt know who wrote Silas Marner....you had to go to the library and look it up. If you needed to know this type of info for your work you cant keep going to the library.

What about multiplication and division. Do people really have to know how to do this anymore? A simple solar calculator at walmart costs 2 dollars, and phones and tablets have that capability. Can we blame kids for not memorizing things in school or memorizing and then forgetting because to them this info is easily retreivable.

Do kids wonder why they have to remember points in history and regurgitate it on a test....when they know throughout life they can always look them up at anytime on a smartphone.

Is knowledge about history, literature, Geography etc, the new age "trvia" to our younger generation, like knowledge about sports , tv, and radio shows was trivia to my generation.

I dont know the answer to this....just posing the question.
beachbumbabs
Administrator
beachbumbabs
Joined: May 21, 2013
  • Threads: 74
  • Posts: 8583
February 21st, 2014 at 6:09:38 PM permalink
Quote: LarryS

The other thread on IQ got me thinking.

I remember growing up and watching jeopardy thru the years and admiring how "smart" some of these eople are.

But now with our technology.....where gameshow questions can be answered from a smartphone or tablet...is memoraization of these facts the signs of "smart "people?
Today if someone knows the answer to the question ?who wrote "Silas Marner"...is it "smart"...or is it as trivial as some who can answer "what was the name of the second episode of Star Trek". Is memorization of knowledge as important in this day and age as it was 20 years ago.

20 years ago, if you didnt know who wrote Silas Marner....you had to go to the library and look it up. If you needed to know this type of info for your work you cant keep going to the library.

What about multiplication and division. Do people really have to know how to do this anymore? A simple solar calculator at walmart costs 2 dollars, and phones and tablets have that capability. Can we blame kids for not memorizing things in school or memorizing and then forgetting because to them this info is easily retreivable.

Do kids wonder why they have to remember points in history and regurgitate it on a test....when they know throughout life they can always look them up at anytime on a smartphone.

Is knowledge about history, literature, Geography etc, the new age "trvia" to our younger generation, like knowledge about sports , tv, and radio shows was trivia to my generation.

I dont know the answer to this....just posing the question.



I think almost every profession is moving towards specialization, whether medicine, law, finance, manufacturing, whatever. The corollary to that trend would be, for most people, a lessening in knowledge of other areas. There's simply not time to be a generalist if your profession requires a huge commitment to continuing proficiency in all details of your specialty. I saw it a lot in my industry (air traffic control) which had a dozen or more sub-specialties and very few crossover generalists of any skill. There's a specialist fallacy just like a gambler's fallacy, not restricted to my profession, but often demonstrated there; the arrogance of the learned, who genuinely do know what they're talking about when the subject is their specialty, often make the fallacious assumption that their expertise translates into a greater intelligence or field of knowledge than they possess.

The trick to trivia (as a former trivia-room moderator of several years) is not so much a wealth of facts; it's being able to associate and recall facts with groups of key words filed in your brain for easy and fast retrieval. It's an exercise in time as well as knowledge base in almost every iteration.

The key to intelligent thought is not so much memorization of facts, but again goes back to keyword and keyfact grouping; from that basis, association of ideas, trend identification, extrapolation of logical but unknown data, hypothesis formation, and advancement of understanding all can progress. Some day, Google in the nth generation may acquire enough associative synapses that it approaches the human brain in learning, then intelligent and unique thought, if it is able to move beyond simple associative algorithms to abstract and self-improving adaptive behavior. I don't think we're all that far from that, but there's a cognitive breakthrough in programming that will have to happen first.
"If the house lost every hand, they wouldn't deal the game."
AxiomOfChoice
AxiomOfChoice
Joined: Sep 12, 2012
  • Threads: 32
  • Posts: 5761
February 21st, 2014 at 6:15:53 PM permalink
I don't think that knowledge of trivia is a particularly good substitute for intelligence. Certainly "knowledge" and "intelligence" are different things (although being intelligent probably makes it easier to gather large amounts of knowledge, all else being equal, so there is probably some correlation between knowledgeability and intelligence)
rxwine
rxwine
Joined: Feb 28, 2010
  • Threads: 146
  • Posts: 6044
February 21st, 2014 at 6:19:51 PM permalink
When I first saw computers show up at work (years ago obviously), some people talked about the eventual efficiency and perhaps less work or mental effort. In fact, I think the lesson may be that once you have more efficient tools they (in the general sense of "they") find ways to increase your workload.

In other words, if you can figure a way to chop ten logs in the time it took to chop one, someone else figures out how to give you eleven logs.
It's so overt, it's covert.
AxiomOfChoice
AxiomOfChoice
Joined: Sep 12, 2012
  • Threads: 32
  • Posts: 5761
February 21st, 2014 at 6:21:34 PM permalink
Quote: rxwine

When I first saw computers show up at work (years ago obviously), some people talked about the eventual efficiency and perhaps less work or mental effort. In fact, I think the lesson may be that once you have more efficient tools they (in the general sense of "they") find ways to increase your workload.

In other words, if you can figure a way to chop ten logs in the time it took to chop one, someone else figures out how to give you eleven logs.



Well, a lot of jobs have been eliminated. You no longer have to pay someone to file, for example.
Mosca
Mosca
Joined: Dec 14, 2009
  • Threads: 169
  • Posts: 3351
February 21st, 2014 at 6:23:10 PM permalink
I've always paired intelligence with curiosity; smart people are curious about things. That often leads to them remembering facts, not to be smarter but for fun. The one doesn't necessarily indicate the other, in that not all smart people remember a lot of trivia, but there is a correlation.
NO KILL I
AxelWolf
AxelWolf
Joined: Oct 10, 2012
  • Threads: 113
  • Posts: 11846
February 21st, 2014 at 6:24:48 PM permalink
Quote: AxiomOfChoice

I don't think that knowledge of trivia is a particularly good substitute for intelligence. Certainly "knowledge" and "intelligence" are different things (although being intelligent probably makes it easier to gather large amounts of knowledge, all else being equal, so there is probably some correlation between knowledgeability and intelligence people)

I agree
♪♪Now you swear and kick and beg us That you're not a gamblin' man Then you find you're back in Vegas With a handle in your hand♪♪ Your black cards can make you money So you hide them when you're able In the land of casinos and money You must put them on the table♪♪ You go back Jack do it again roulette wheels turinin' 'round and 'round♪♪ You go back Jack do it again♪♪
SkittleCar1
SkittleCar1
Joined: Feb 7, 2014
  • Threads: 12
  • Posts: 153
February 21st, 2014 at 6:26:05 PM permalink
I only know Silas Marner from the popular film, "A Christmas Story."

Please, continue with the thread. :)
endermike
endermike
Joined: Dec 10, 2013
  • Threads: 7
  • Posts: 584
February 21st, 2014 at 6:26:45 PM permalink
(sorry for the nerdy analogy, but it has been the simplest way for me to think about it)

I have generally thought of it as a human is like a computer. The performance of said computer is loosely based on 3 things: Memory (the D drive), RAM and processor, and the OS/programs installed.

*RAM/processor: this is"smarts," it is raw thinking power that a person can turn onto a given problem
*OS/programs installed: this knowing how to solve various problems (interacting with others, pattern recognition, etc.)
*Memory (the D drive): This s all of the "facts" someone knows.

For example: Pi.
1) I know Pi is about 3.14159 (Memory)
2) I know how to build methods for deriving the value of Pi (OS/programs installed)
3) The speed I can execute 2 (RAM/processor)
beachbumbabs
Administrator
beachbumbabs
Joined: May 21, 2013
  • Threads: 74
  • Posts: 8583
February 21st, 2014 at 6:35:23 PM permalink
Quote: AxiomOfChoice

I don't think that knowledge of trivia is a particularly good substitute for intelligence. Certainly "knowledge" and "intelligence" are different things (although being intelligent probably makes it easier to gather large amounts of knowledge, all else being equal, so there is probably some correlation between knowledgeability and intelligence)



I separated out trivia knowledge from intelligence to differentiate them, not to suggest one was a definitive indication of the other (assuming you're addressing my post). In fact, I meant to make the opposite case, in likening trivia knowledge to any other specialty; while there are similarities in method and some correlation in individual cases, it's entirely possible to be very good at trivia without exceptional intelligence.
"If the house lost every hand, they wouldn't deal the game."

  • Jump to: