Ibeatyouraces
Ibeatyouraces
Joined: Jan 12, 2010
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July 13th, 2017 at 9:50:58 AM permalink
I wonder if Nolan Dalla is still trying to get his $5000 from Bellagio.
"And that's the bottom lineeeee, cuz Stone Cold said so!"
BobDancer
BobDancer
Joined: Jun 22, 2013
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July 13th, 2017 at 11:10:36 AM permalink
Quote: AxelWolf

When is Bob N retiring (not that I want him too) and who will fill his shoes. Who here in Vegas does he recommend other than himself?



Hmm. I'm not going to ask Bob N who his most worthy competition is. One of the reasons he does come on the show is to increase his profile among gamblers, and asking him to give a plug to other lawyers strikes me as unfair. If it helps you any, he has said that Thea Sankiewicz is a smarter gambling lawyer than he is!
BobDancer
BobDancer
Joined: Jun 22, 2013
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July 13th, 2017 at 11:29:54 AM permalink
Quote: Romes



Q3: I was once offered a bunch of promotional chips seemingly out of the blue from a casino and all I had to do was come in and sign a promotional chip form. A small part of me thought it might be a setup to get me to come in so they could detain me, or to have me sign something I didn't want to sign. I have done nothing illegal, ever, in a casino. While it ended up working out just fine, and the form only discussed the promo chips, what legal recourse would I have if the casino had been setting me up to be detained or arrested? Is this legal for them to do if they think you cheated, say if they didn't understand what hole carding was?



First of all, Romes, great question!

The problem is, it puts Bob N in an awkward position. Hypothetically let's say Bob says it would be perfectly legal for a casino to use this ruse. Also assume (correctly) that there are casino employees listening to this podcast. If a similar case were to come up where Bob was representing the player, that casino could bring in a recording of the podcast and ask why Bob argued one thing on the air and another thing in the courtroom? That might hurt his chances in a future trial.

Also, if Bob answered that this is okay for a casino to do, we might well have casino executives saying, "Wow! What a great idea! Never thought of it. We'll use it in the future to screw APs?"

Several times, off the air, Bob has told Richard and me that he didn't want to discuss certain questions for these exact reasons. This strikes me as one of those questions.
AxelWolf
AxelWolf
Joined: Oct 10, 2012
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July 13th, 2017 at 11:30:42 AM permalink
Quote: BobDancer

Hmm. I'm not going to ask Bob N who his most worthy competition is. One of the reasons he does come on the show is to increase his profile among gamblers, and asking him to give a plug to other lawyers strikes me as unfair. If it helps you any, he has said that Thea Sankiewicz is a smarter gambling lawyer than he is!

I see your point.

I don't know how it works when it comes to attorneys referring other attorneys. I was under the impression Bob N was not taking on a lot of new cases unless they were juicy ones. I assume there are cases that have some merit that he's not interested in. Would he not refer someone to another attorney in that case? I guess that's not something you would want to say publicly since you would lose the referral "credit".
♪♪Now you swear and kick and beg us That you're not a gamblin' man Then you find you're back in Vegas With a handle in your hand♪♪ Your black cards can make you money So you hide them when you're able In the land of casinos and money You must put them on the table♪♪ You go back Jack do it again roulette wheels turinin' 'round and 'round♪♪ You go back Jack do it again♪♪
AxelWolf
AxelWolf
Joined: Oct 10, 2012
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July 13th, 2017 at 11:41:43 AM permalink
This might not be a question for Bob. I would like to know his feelings on gambling establishments making faults claims and if there's anything there. I see a few places claiming up to 99% and they don't even come close. One location even skips the UP TO and just claims the payback is 98 or 99%.

I think Mike has tackled this issue without much success(?)
♪♪Now you swear and kick and beg us That you're not a gamblin' man Then you find you're back in Vegas With a handle in your hand♪♪ Your black cards can make you money So you hide them when you're able In the land of casinos and money You must put them on the table♪♪ You go back Jack do it again roulette wheels turinin' 'round and 'round♪♪ You go back Jack do it again♪♪
BobDancer
BobDancer
Joined: Jun 22, 2013
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July 13th, 2017 at 11:54:07 AM permalink
Quote: AxelWolf

I see your point.

I don't know how it works when it comes to attorneys referring other attorneys. I was under the impression Bob N was not taking on a lot of new cases unless they were juicy ones. I assume there are cases that have some merit that he's not interested in. Would he not refer someone to another attorney in that case? I guess that's not something you would want to say publicly since you would lose the referral "credit".



I see you didn't bite on my Thea Sankiewicz comment. For those who don't know, Thea is Bob's wife and law partner. And I've invited her on the show at least 10 times, but so far it's always been consistently 'no.'

Let me get the question in this way: Let's say a decent gambling case walks in your door but you just too busy to take it. Do you generally just tell the player 'no,' or do you refer other specific lawyers you think are competent?

That way, Bob can decide for himself whether he wants to 'name names.' He may or may not, but it's his decision and not mine.
billryan
billryan
Joined: Nov 2, 2009
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July 13th, 2017 at 12:28:49 PM permalink
Not specific to Bob N but I'm curious if you give the interviewee a chance to see the questions before hand, so they are prepared for them.
For example, do you give them a list of twenty five questions and tell them you will choose a couple, or give them a heads up on the subjects you will question them on. Has a person ever asked you to ask them a specific question in advance.
This isn't investigative journalism so I don't believe there is anything wrong with any of those practices. Just curious if you do.
I once accompanied a celebrity sports personality as he made the rounds of various stations promoting his new book and in many cases, a production assistant would call or fax over general questions so he was prepared instead of having dead air while he thought about the question.
Have you ever asked a guest what sort of tree they would be?
It's what you do and not what you say If you're not part of the future then get out of the way
onenickelmiracle
onenickelmiracle
Joined: Jan 26, 2012
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July 13th, 2017 at 12:39:07 PM permalink
Is Gaming the only place to go if a person feels defrauded by a drawing? Will the post office/ consumer affairs/ better business bureau etc.) do anything investigating mail fraud/deceptive advertising?

Also has he ever been able to get punitive damages against a casino?
Looks like sh!t just got imaginary!
Romes
Romes
Joined: Jul 22, 2014
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July 13th, 2017 at 2:29:14 PM permalink
Quote: BobDancer

First of all, Romes, great question!

The problem is, it puts Bob N in an awkward position. Hypothetically let's say Bob says it would be perfectly legal for a casino to use this ruse. Also assume (correctly) that there are casino employees listening to this podcast. If a similar case were to come up where Bob was representing the player, that casino could bring in a recording of the podcast and ask why Bob argued one thing on the air and another thing in the courtroom? That might hurt his chances in a future trial.

Also, if Bob answered that this is okay for a casino to do, we might well have casino executives saying, "Wow! What a great idea! Never thought of it. We'll use it in the future to screw APs?"

Several times, off the air, Bob has told Richard and me that he didn't want to discuss certain questions for these exact reasons. This strikes me as one of those questions.

Fair enough. If it needs to be wrapped in a "in his opinion" to not be held liable for anything, I'm just looking for his opinion =P. I would imagine it's quite illegal for the casino to lure players in just to detain them/illegally obtain their information, etc, etc. However if he doesn't feel he can answer this without giving casinos ideas, then no harm no foul.
Playing it correctly means you've already won.
Ayecarumba
Ayecarumba
Joined: Nov 17, 2009
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July 13th, 2017 at 2:46:05 PM permalink
Quote: MrV

Assume that someone hits a small jackpot, one that requires a hand pay: call it $1500 or so at slots.

Assume also that the player, for whatever reason, is adamant that he does NOT want the win reported to the IRS.

Given the above, can a player who won a hand pay make a deal with the casino to accept a reduced amount, say $1199, instead of the larger amount in order to avoid having the casino generate the otherwise mandatory W-2G / IRS notification?

It would be a win / win for both of them, if it is legal.



This known as "structuring" and is illegal. This very practice has resulted in shutdowns of casinos while armed government agents collect and carry boxes of records out the door. A few weeks later, there's an announcement that significant fines are being imposed, and most importantly, gaming licenses are lost.
America is all about speed. Hot, nasty, bad-ass speed. - Eleanor Roosevelt, 1936

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